Seaford ready for Y2K

By Tony E. Windsor

Due to scheduling concerns, the City of Seaford cancelled a recent public meeting, which was to have addressed the city's Y2K compliance status, but the city has decided to make the Y2K (Year 2000) information available to citizens via a phone call to Seaford Power Manager Dave Thomas.
During a recent meeting of Seaford's Mayor and Council, City Manager Dolores Slatcher announced the cancellation of the event and was met with opposition from one council member.
Slatcher said because of the holidays it would be very difficult to re-schedule the Y2K meeting. Mayor Dan Short said he was aware of three such meetings held by the county in which public participation was very minimal.
Councilman Ronald MacArthur, who had originally recommended the public meeting, said he felt there is enough community interest in learning about Seaford's Y2K plan to warrant trying to re-schedule the meeting.
"Even if nobody shows up for the meeting I think people should have the opportunity," he said. "I have had several people contact me expressing their concerns about Y2K and this meeting would be helpful to them."
Slatcher said that the city gave a Y2K update in its recent newsletter that went out to residents and the city is happy to have anyone call to ask questions about the issue or to possibly schedule Thomas to give a presentation to a small group or civic organization.

Slatcher said that the city gave a Y2K update in its recent newsletter that went out to residents and the city is happy to have anyone call to ask questions about the issue or to possibly schedule Thomas to give a presentation to a small group or civic organization.
MacArthur said he was comfortable with this as long as residents have access to have their questions answered or concerns addressed.
Thomas has made the Y2K presentation on several occasions, including a recent Seaford Mayor and Council meeting.
Concerns have surfaced internationally over how some computer chips may react to reading the last two zeroes in the date 2000. If the computers cannot read the date correctly it can affect the functioning of those units which control public services, such as power, the banking system, hospitals and transportation.
Thomas and other city staff have made it a priority over the past months to check all computers in the city's operations. In an October presentation to mayor and council, Thomas said he is "cautiously optimistic" about midnight, Dec. 31, 1999.
"There may be some type of computer failures, or there may be nothing to occur at all," he said. "I think what most experts are suggesting is that people prepare as if they were expecting a major storm event.
"Nobody really knows what will happen or how long it may last. We just want to be prepared for the worst case scenario."
Anyone with questions about Seaford's status regarding Y2K, or to possibly have Thomas speak to a group, can contact him at 628-6020, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.